Review: Christianity in the Roman Empire

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Christianity in the Roman empire

Christianity in the Roman EmpireRobert E. Winn. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2018.

Summary: A survey of Christian history in the post-apostolic era from 100 to 300 A.D., introducing the reader to key figures, events, controversies, and the development of various church practices and structures.

For many of us, there is a huge gap in our knowledge of the history of Christianity that extends from the close of the New Testament era until the Reformation era. The era this book covers, 100-300 A.D. was particularly crucial not only in the church’s response to persecution, but also in the development of various aspects of church order and practice and the growing recognition of the body of works the church would consider canonical, and figuring out the relation of these to the Hebrew scriptures they began to call the Old Testament. In addition, controversy forced the church to more clearly articulate…

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Emil Brunner on the Incarnation

On the occasion of the 129th anniversary of Swiss Reformed theologian Emil Brunner (1889–1966)—especially so close to Christmas—we thought it would be fitting to share an excerpt from the book on Brunner from Hendrickson’s Makers of the Modern Theological Mind series by J. Edward Humphrey (1918–1999), who studied under Brunner in the 1940s. The Incarnation … Continue reading Emil Brunner on the Incarnation

One Year Graded Septuagint Reading Plan

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

We have been really pleased over the past several weeks to see the enthusiastic reception of the Reader‘s Edition. It’s garnered a lot of positive attention in various outlets in terms of both production and content. Here are some examples from around the blogosphere:

Zwinglius Redivivus
Abram K-J
Exegetical Tools
Evangelical Textual Criticism
theLAB
Books At a Glance
There is even a pretty lengthy unboxing video and a shorter one.

Amidst all this discussion, one question has been raised fairly often: Where should I start?

The Plan and the Ranking Index

In an effort to help answer this question, I have drawn up a one year reading plan for working through the Septuagint from easier portions to harder portions of the corpus. I explain the nitty-gritty details on the first page of the plan, which you can view and/or download below.

The short and sweet version is that…

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An Excerpt from The Essential Writings of Meredith G. Kline

By Sarah Welch, Editorial Assistant In honor of Meredith G. Kline’s birthday, I’m excited to share a passage from Essential Writings of Meredith G. Kline. I’ve chosen an excerpt that strikes me not only because it uses linguistic evidence to interpret a passage of the Bible, but because the way Kline demonstrates God’s involvement in … Continue reading An Excerpt from The Essential Writings of Meredith G. Kline

Remembering Thomas Merton and Karl Barth Fifty Years Later

By Patricia Anders, Editorial Director Not too long ago, I was surprised to discover that two of my favorite theologians died on exactly the same day: December 10, 1968. Thomas Merton (1915–1968) died at the age of 53 near Bangkok, Thailand, and Karl Barth (1886–1968) died at 82 in Basel, Switzerland. Since it is the … Continue reading Remembering Thomas Merton and Karl Barth Fifty Years Later

We’re Giving Away Two Free Copies!

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

septuaginta_group2

We are excited to announce that we are giving away two free copies of Septuaginta: A Reader’s Edition. To register to win, enter your name and email address in the form below (we will not use your contact info for other purposes).

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How Christians Should Approach Controversial Books

By Sarah Welch, Editorial Assistant I thought a lot about reconciliation while reading Daniel Crane’s book 7 Books that Rocked the Church, which discusses—you guessed it—seven books which at different points have unsettled leaders and members of the Christian church. Included are well-known titles like Darwin’s Origin of Species, and one or two I was … Continue reading How Christians Should Approach Controversial Books

Herman Bavinck’s Philosophy of Revelation, World War I, and Trying to Be Our Own Creator and Redeemer

By Patricia Anders, Editorial Director The modern man no longer feels himself a miserable creature, who has fallen from his original destiny, and no longer regards the earth as a vale of tears, which has taken the place of the original paradise. He can conceive nothing more wonderful than this beautiful world, which has evolved … Continue reading Herman Bavinck’s Philosophy of Revelation, World War I, and Trying to Be Our Own Creator and Redeemer

Five Takeaways from Septuaginta: A Reader’s Edition

By Tirzah Frank, Assistant Editor Ordinarily, I’d write this post about how the Septuagint is important, how the reader’s edition will help students of New Testament Greek expand their Koine horizons, and how excited I personally am for this opportunity to explore more Greek. However, Ross and Lanier have been doing a great job covering … Continue reading Five Takeaways from Septuaginta: A Reader’s Edition

Reformation 501 Roundup: Our Top 5 Picks of Books about the Reformation

By Sarah Welch, Editorial Assistant Last year, we recognized the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation on October 31—the date on which Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the doors of the Wittenberg Castle church in 1517. Luther’s theses condemned practices of the Catholic church which he felt contradicted Jesus’ teaching of repentance, focusing … Continue reading Reformation 501 Roundup: Our Top 5 Picks of Books about the Reformation